Tag Archives: vintage

Reviving Revivals

I was paging through the latest Elle magazine, looking at one of the Trends pages, when I spotted a blouse with puffed sleeves. Elaborate blouses with ruffles, voluminous sleeves and other types of flounces are in this summer. The pictured blouse turned out to be from Zara, which has quite a few variations on these romantic looks.

Zara blouse with puffed sleevesZara Victorian Style blouseZara puffed sleeve blouse with detachable sleeves

On one hand, I think “Fresh, new fun sleeves!”

On the other hand, I think, “Where have I seen these before?” I paged through my copy of How to Read a Dress by Lydia Edwards, and sure enough, there were the sleeves, on dresses from the 1830s.

Many vintage enthusiasts like to look at the latest fashions and find the vintage “original” versions. If you love the Victorian ruffles and Regency sleeves, you may be thinking “Well, I’m only going to see those in a museum, not in my local vintage shop.”

But you just might see styles like this in the 1970s and 1980s sections of your favorite vintage store. Some of you might be old enough to recall Gunne Sax prom dresses from the late 1970s or Princess Diana’s leg-of-mutton sleeves on her gowns. The 1970s and 1980s witnessed revivals of Regency and Victorian styles of dresses and blouses.

In fact, Victorian and Edwardian blouses and dresses were the first styles that were worn when wearing “vintage” was first becoming a trend in the late 1960s. Hip, edgy fashion-conscious youth would shop thrift stores and find original Victorian and Edwardian garments.

I’m currently writing a book about vintage style, and one question I often encounter is “What kinds of vintage styles were in during the _______?” (Fill in the blank with the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, etc.). Vintage style changes along with the looks that are currently on the runways. Vintage shops in the 1980s were often destinations for 1940s and 1950s looks, while the 1960s were more popular in the 1990s.

Here’s the table I’ve been working on that summarizes what vintage looks were in when. Notice that I start each decade mid-decade rather than at the beginning. That’s because often a decade’s iconic style isn’t apparent until mid-decade, as this recent New York Times article shows when it declares – in 2017, mind you – that the style of the 2010s can finally be discerned as “covered” (i.e. modest dress). Anything that you’d add to this table summarizing what vintage styles were in for whom and from what influences? Maybe we can predict the next vintage trend…..

Table: What was in during what decade?

Copyright 2017, Nancy L. Fischer

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Like vintage? Say why for a chance to win gift certificates!

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Hi there vintage fans!

I’ll continue with regular blog posts after Feb 15th. In the mean time, if you haven’t yet had a chance to complete my survey on why you wear vintage, then click on the link below and get started! If you complete a survey, you’ll be entered in a drawing to win 1 of 3 $30 etsy.com gift certificates, where you can find a huge selection of vintage clothing. You can find more info on the survey by clicking the link or by checking out my December 2015 blog post. Thanks and have a groovy day!

Click here to start vintage clothing survey

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Why do you wear & buy vintage?

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Hey vintage clothing wearers: Here’s an opportunity to win one of three $30 etsy.com gift certificates by answering this survey I’ve been working on.

click here for survey on why you wear vintage

“Why a survey for those who wear vintage clothing?” you might ask. I have been researching vintage and secondhand clothing in some way for the last five years. I’ve interviewed vintage clothing store owners in the Twin Cities, and I’ve researched when wearing vintage first became a mainstream trend in the United States.  Augsburg Now, the Augsburg College alumni magazine, recently interviewed me about my ongoing vintage clothing research, in case you’re curious.

I’ve read a ton of the academic literature about vintage, retro and secondhand over the last five years. I’ve enjoyed reading the vintage guides and coffee table books as well. It turns out there are a lot of assumptions about vintage and retro clothing enthusiasts in that literature! I’m a sociologist, so my approach is “Why just assume? Why not ask people?” So based on all that I’ve read, the conversations I’ve had with folks, and my own experiences with vintage, I’m now asking, “Why do you wear and buy vintage clothing?”

I’ve put together a survey for people who wear and/or buy vintage clothing. I’m hoping you would like to help out with this project. As an incentive to take the time to complete the survey, after the survey closes (on February 16th, 2016), I will conduct a drawing to choose three winners of $30 Etsy.com gift certificates.  Just click on the link above to take the survey. And if you know other vintage clothing wearers – whether they wear it occasionally or all the time – please send them the link to this page. The more folks who share their thoughts, the better!

Thank you – I really appreciate your help and look forward to hearing more about why you wear vintage!

Update Dec. 18th: Thanks to those of you who let me know there was a glitch in the survey. I’ve fixed it. You can let me know at fischern@augsburg.edu if you encounter any other problems.

-Nancy L. Fischer

 

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Does this look too costume-y?

60s Nance 10 31 15 - 1

I’ve had my moments of vintage clothing buying when I want everything from the era for a certain look – the right 60s skirt, top, and then even hat, gloves and purse. But anyone who reads vintage styling tips knows, if you wear them all together, you run the risk of looking like you’re wearing a costume, rather than being stylish in the here and now. I can get away with a vintage skirt, and definitely a vintage purse, but a hat too? Definitely looking like I’m going to a theme party.

That’s why I love Halloween. Other than having a Mod 60s Party to attend, it’s the one night of the year I can put together the whole look – hat, gloves, top, bottom, and purse – and get away with it. And it’s great fun to be out in public, wearing a 60s pillbox! People who find the look odd think I’m in costume, and those who like vintage dig seeing the whole look together.

So vintage lovers, I hope you’ve taken advantage of Halloween as a chance to push the style boundaries a little and wear that entire Mad Men look tonight. Happy Halloween!

Is that a Halloween costume or how she normally dresses?

Is that a Halloween costume or how she normally dresses?

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Ethical Dilemmas in Refashioning Vintage Clothes

vogue jacket

My mother was an excellent seamstress when I was in high school. I didn’t have much incentive to learn to sew myself since I could never make anything that was as high quality as what my mother could produce. It was a love of vintage clothing that eventually brought me into the world of sewing decades later. I was walking by St. Paul’s awesome fabric store Treadle Yard Goods and noticed a 50s style dress that bowled me over. It turned out to be the diamond dress pattern from the retro pattern company Decades of Style. I went in and bought the pattern even though I didn’t even own a sewing machine. I’m now on my second sewing machine (a vintage Bernina) and I have accumulated a mini-library of vintage patterns (ironically, I still haven’t made that diamond dress!).

Learning to sew has expanded what vintage items I can buy and successfully wear. I regularly make routine alterations such as hemming, letting out or taking in seams. I think of these alterations as uncontroversial. I never even cut the hem when I take up a skirt so that if the next owner is taller, she’ll have something to work with. And I normally avoid trimming seam allowances I’ve taken in for the same reason.

Where things get a little more ethically uncomfortable for me is when I’m permanently altering the garment in ways that it can’t return to its original state. I’ve altered a maxi into a mini. And if I really love a long vintage skirt that has a tiny waist (I comfort myself with the thought that they wore girdles back in those days, right?), I’ve cut off the waistband and re-sewn it with a contour waistline (mark the new waist-line using a pattern if you’re trying this at home). The contour style waistband-less skirt is not authentic to the time period, but it fits me comfortably.

And re-shaping a waist is one thing, but what about a complete re-fashion? I adore Charity Shop Chic or Jillian Owens’ blog Refashionista where fantastic seamstresses take thrift store finds and makes them into cute clothes for a night out on the town. They, of course, work with cast-off clothing. What about cutting into a vintage garment and refashioning it into something more contemporary? I’m probably treading on vintage ethical thin ice, but I’ll admit I’ve done it. I love 1950s novelty print skirts like this brown one below, but they usually have the tiny waists I was referring to above.

Venice skirt 3

This leads me to the story of my first novelty skirt I found. It was a lavender novelty print skirt with a 23-inch waist. When I cut off the waistband in order to create a new one and shorten the skirt, I discovered over 2 yards of fabric tightly gathered in that tiny waistband!  I ultimately decided not to make it into another skirt – I had enough fabric for an entire dress and made the one you see below.

1950s skirt is now a dress

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And the jacket at the top of this blog post? The herringbone section made up a bulky skirt that I watched hang unloved in a local vintage shop for two years before I bought it and turned it into the 1960s Vogue jacket pattern.

But should I have made the cuts and re-worked the skirts?

I never really thought about the ethics of altering vintage until I had a conversation with a Ph.D. student from the University of Minnesota’s Design-Apparel Studies program. With her training in textile conservation, she brought up how altering vintage clothing posed a real dilemma – the conservationist in her wanted to leave the clothes un-molested, but the fashionista wanted to alter and wear. Re-fashioning old clothing to re-shape it into new styles is an old practice. Patricia Allerston in Reconstructing the Second-Hand Clothes Trade in Sixteenth- and Seventeen-Century Venice reasoned that there are few surviving examples of Italian Renaissance clothing because the fabric remained valuable after a particular style faded, and old garments were re-worked into new ones.

So does that mean (gulp) that when I remove a genuine 1950s tiny waistband that I’m contributing to a world where no one will know what these waistbands look like or how small 50s young women once were?

It’s possible. That’s why I’ve felt a little nervous about my past vintage refashions.  Yet, I will say that losing examples of 1950s skirts seems less probable than the loss of surviving 16th- and 17th-century Venetian dresses. The Venetian textiles remained valuable because they were rare, painstaking handcrafted by expert weavers, and so they were sewn into something else. The 1950s fabrics are high quality but mass-produced – not the same type of high quality as Venetian brocades. Finding examples today of 1950s textiles is thankfully not that difficult. Moreover, because we are more fascinated by our recent past than the Renaissance Venetians probably were, people keep their high quality old clothes. Museums and historical societies regularly collect antique garments – from haute couture to everyday wear – as part of their conservation efforts. And today’s grand dames of fashion are willing to ensure that the iconic clothing of past decades is conserved (for example, I recently watched the documentary Iris about Iris Apfel, who was donating her clothing to the Peabody Essex Museum).

I definitely haven’t taken the ethical high road of conservationism when it comes to making my vintage clothes work for today. I do keep alterations to a minimum rather than frequently engaging in a full-scale re-fashioning. And I should note that the designer garments I own are off-limits for anything but hemming – their value is retained through minimal to no change. But in the end I rationalize that re-fashioning old styles into new garments is also a part of our Western heritage and is a tradition that I’m carrying on, for better or for worse.

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Vintage, the First 40 Years

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I’m back! Where have I been? It turns out I have been reading about one thousand magazine and newspaper articles published since 1950 on secondhand and vintage clothing. I wanted to uncover the history of the vintage fashion trend, and find out how wearing secondhand clothing shifted from being viewed as rather pitiful to vintage chic in the United States.

It was an interesting journey. I learned that (at least in the United States press) the word “vintage” was first applied to clothing in 1957 when the Chicago Tribune referred to new clothing that recollected 1930s looks as “vintage.” Then the meaning of “vintage clothing” was that the 30s-looking clothing, like well-aged wine, reflected good years for style. Ten years later, the New York Times reports that a 1966 London trend of wearing old clothing as street style has crossed the pond. This category of fashionable old clothing came to be called “vintage clothing.” I also learned that fashion magazines considerably trailed the newspaper press in announcing the vintage clothing trend. While New York clothing dealers worried that there was going to be a shortage of vintage clothing because the market was so hot through the 1970s – even department stores were selling it – it wasn’t until 1979 that Vogue magazine rather dismissively announced a “boom in vintage clothes.” Not surprisingly perhaps, I discovered that 1970s vintage consumers were looking for the same qualities in vintage that we love today – unique, high quality clothing that is sourced in a more eco-conscious way than newly made clothing.

If you’re interested in finding out how vintage clothing was talked about as it emerged as a trend, you can read my article, “Vintage, the First 40 Years: The Emergence and Persistence of Vintage Style in the United States” in the journal Culture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural Research. The article is part of a special issue on Circulating Stuff through Second-hand, Vintage and Retro Markets. I’d like to thank the editors Staffan Appelgren and Anna Bohlin for putting together a great issue!

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Is it Vintage, Retro or Secondhand? Identify that Retrorama Dress!

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Last weekend I attended one of my favorite vintage events in the Twin Cities: Retrorama at the Minnesota History Center. It’s the one night of the year when I blend into a crowd, wearing a vintage 1960s black lace cocktail dress and my ice-blue cat-eye glasses!

Retrorama has me thinking about some questions that I am frequently asked: What makes a garment “vintage”? Does “vintage” differ from other types of secondhand / used clothing? And does “retro” mean the same thing as “vintage”? I’ll use some photos from Retrorama to answer those questions.

What does “vintage” refer to? My own general definition is that “vintage clothing” refers to garments that are at least 20 years old that have a recognizable look that communicates the style of an earlier decade. The key to this definition is that the garment is really 20+ years old rather than a newer reproduction of an older look. Thus, “vintage” as a concept is closely linked with authenticity. If you buy a vintage dress or necktie, it’s probably because you find it rewarding to wear the genuine article. These fabulous 1970s orange vinyl boots (from this year’s Retrorama) are authentically vintage:

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1970s Orange Vinyl Boots at Retrorama 2013

But that’s my definition. Hayley Bush, the owner of Saint Paul’s Lula Vintage informed me that, for the purposes of obtaining a business license, the City of Saint Paul defines “vintage” as clothing that is 25 years or older.

Why, you might ask, would a city bother to define vintage? I suspect the answer is to distinguish vintage clothing stores from ordinary secondhand and/or thrift stores, which have less cultural cache. It turns out cities regard secondhand clothing stores as a possible indicator of urban blight (and perhaps they associate vintage clothing stores with gentrification or urban revitalization). For example, the City of Minneapolis has an ordinance that regulates that pawn shops, homeless shelters and secondhand clothing stores must not be located close together. Is it fair to assume all secondhand stores will encourage a downward spiral of a neighborhood’s economy? Probably not. But I digress.

My digression brings me to the next question: What is secondhand? Secondhand clothing is the umbrella term for all used clothing, whether 20+ years old or younger. So “vintage” is a special type of secondhand clothing. So ordinary secondhand is the dress from H & M that you found at Buffalo Exchange. It’s also most of the apparel that populates thrift stores and, on the more upscale end of the continuum, the clothing at consignment stores.

This leads me to another digression – a pet peeve. The word “vintage” sounds more exotic than “secondhand,” so some stores and media photo shoots call a garment vintage when it’s really a recently-used garment. I will look at the shirt and think, “I saw this in the stores a few years ago – this is not from an earlier decade and it’s not vintage!” No wonder I am frequently asked what “vintage” means – the label increasingly is employed to describe all used clothes. Anyway, here’s an example of a cute secondhand dress from Vita’mn’s photos from Retrorama:

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Secondhand Dress, Retrorama 2013 (from Vita’mn)

Finally, what does “retro” mean? Now that’s more slippery. Merriam-Webster’s on-line definition illustrates the slipperiness: “relating to, reviving, or being the styles and especially the fashions of the past : fashionably nostalgic or old-fashioned.” See? Retro can refer to something that “relates” or “revives” or actually is a fashion from the past. With this definition, vintage and retro can be the same thing. And in Europe, I’ve noticed, “retro” is usually the favored term over “vintage.”

However, I prefer Wikipedia’s definition of “retro”: “Imitative of a style, fashion, or design from the recent past.” The key word here is “imitative,” thus suggesting that “retro” is “repro” – it’s a reproduction of a past fashionable look. I prefer this definition because it keeps “vintage” and “retro” distinct.

Why am I so fussy about “retro” versus “vintage”? It’s the authenticity issue – vintage is a genuine artifact from the past. For example, when I pick up a vintage dress, I can tell something about what colors were once in vogue. I can tell how clothes were made to have a different fit reflecting earlier ideas of what a body should be doing (for example, armholes were higher, encouraging straighter posture for the wearer). That’s why I think it’s important to know what is vintage versus what is a reproduction.

Don’t get me wrong – I love retro clothes. The advantage of retro over vintage is it’s easier to find your size, and the fit reflects today’s expectations of what a body does and thus gives the wearer more ease of movement. It’s fun to go into a retro store and see older styles in so many colors and sizes. So not surprisingly, at “Retro”rama, there are fine examples of retro:

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Bettie Page “retro” look, Retrorama 2013 (from Vita’mn)

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Bettie Page “retro” look, Retrorama 2013 (from Vita’mn)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But, I’ll admit, the real-deal vintage gives me a thrill. Here was my favorite vintage look from this year’s Retrorama – dig the matching lace pants to that empire-waist tunic!

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1970s Lace Tunic and Matching Pants, Retrorama 2013

Want to see more Retrorama fashion? Here’s a link to the Retrorama Runway photo stream. Enjoy!

– Nancy L. Fischer

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